The Five Most Interesting Questions about Shadow and Bone, Siege and Storm, Ruin and Rising, Leigh Bardugo, and the Grisha Trilogy.

Welcome! If you’re curious about this website, this is part of the Most Interesting Questions series on my blog. I answer the most interesting questions I can find or think of about bestselling franchises, and today I’m going to be covering Leigh Bardugo’s Grisha Trilogy, which starts with Shadow and Bone.

The Grisha trilogy is an epic fantasy series of books for young adults. The Grisha Trilogy/Shadow and Bone explores the Grishaverse, which is another world, separate from our own. It’s kind of like middle-earth in Lord of the Rings, but there’s no elves, dwarves, orcs, or hobbits. The magic is a little bit less powerful, though still very powerful. The events of Shadow and Bone take place in a country called Ravka within the Grishaverse.

If you’ve read the books, you might have picked up on the fact that they take inspiration from pre-industrial Russia. There are old stories inspired by Russian folktales, kings and queens, and the language takes a lot of inspiration from Russian too. To me, that’s really interesting. I love fantasy that takes inspiration from real life, and a world inspired by old Russia is such a unique one.

So, whether you’ve read Shadow and Bone or not, if you’re interested in learning more about it, I’m going to explore the five most interesting questions about Shadow and Bone and the Grisha Trilogy.

Before I do, if you’re wondering about who I am, I’m an author from Portland, OR. I write epic fantasy also, and if you like the Grishaverse and are looking for another good read, I’d encourage you to check out Sand and Smoke, the first book in my Dragon Destiny trilogy, by clicking here.

Q #1) When is the Shadow and Bone Netflix show release date?

A: The Shadow and Bone Netflix show comes out on April, 23, 2021. If you’re wondering about who will be in it, it’s headlined by Jessie Mei Li as Alina Starkov and Archie Renaux as Mal. Meanwhile, Ben Barnes is going to be playing the Darkling. One of the main characters from Shadow and Bone, Nikolai Lantsov, actually won’t be in season one. If there’s a season two, it’s possible he’ll show up then. Also, what has been revealed is that the show will encompass both the events in Shadow and Bone and the events in Six of Crows. Six of Crows is a duology set in the same world as Shadow and Bone, but it takes place in a different country, following a band of criminals in the island country of Kerch, where people from all over the globe mix and mingle. The Shadow and Bone Netflix series will have a lot of ground to cover, tackling both series, spanning a total of five books.

Q #2: What is the best order for reading the Shadow and Bone series or the Grisha Trilogy?

A: In my opinion, publication order is always a good order to go in. Here’s the Shadow and Bone, or Grisha Trilogy, series order: it goes, Shadow and Bone (the first published book), then Siege and Storm, then Ruin and Rising. After that, Six of Crows followed by Crooked Kingdom. However, Six of Crows is a whole lot better than Shadow and Bone. If you’re wondering: can you read Six of Crows before Shadow and Bone, the answer is yes. Bardugo was clearly finding her footing as a writer in the Grisha Trilogy, so it might pay to start the series at Six of Crows. In my opinion, though, the best reading order for Shadow and Bone is a matter of preference. I actually read Six of Crows first, and I really enjoyed the experience of reading that series first, and then diving into Shadow and Bone and the Grisha Trilogy. I think I would have found Shadow and Bone less interesting if I had not read Six of Crows first. Regardless, I wouldn’t advise a reading order for the Grishaverse that starts with anything besides either Shadow and Bone or Six of Crows. Those two books are clearly the best starting points to get into the series.

Q #3: What’s the age rating for Shadow and Bone or what ages is it appropriate for?

The Shadow and Bone age rating, and the Siege and Storm age rating, is 12 and up. It’s a young adult book, so middle-schoolers and high-schoolers are most likely to enjoy it. If you’re wondering about the Shadow and Bone Netflix series age rating, the show hasn’t been released yet as of me writing this, but I’d imagine it will probably be suitable for the same ages; I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s rated pg-13. The Ruin and Rising age rating follows along the same lines. The books are pretty clean overall, there is a suicide in book three, that’s the worst thing that comes to mind for me. There is also a lot of romance in these books, so you should be at least okay with that. If you like romance, then this could be a great series. But be aware that the romance isn’t straightforward, there are a ton of twists and it’s messy and not-exactly-love.

Q #4: Can you give a summary of what happens in Shadow and Bone?

A: I won’t give a chapter by chapter summary, but here’s the gist of what happens. Alina Starkov, an ordinary mapmaker in Ravka, learns that she has amazing powers. She’s a Grisha, which is a magic-user. But she’s not just any Grisha, she’s one of the two most powerful Grisha in existence. The other powerful Grisha is called the Darkling. He takes her under his wing, but she quickly learns that he’s not the man he appears to be. I don’t want to say anything else, because it might spoil the book. If this sounds interesting, then check it out!

Q #5: What characters are in Ruin and Rising?

A: The third book of the Grisha Trilogy features all of the characters you’d expect. Alina and Mal are in most of the book. The Darkling is in some of the book, as is Nikolai. Other characters include Zoe, Baghra, and a whole collection of guys and gals that Alina has recruited to be in her inner circle.

Thanks for reading! If you have already read Shadow and Bone and Six of Crows, I invite you to check out my Dragon Destiny trilogy. I think it’ll appeal to fans of Leigh Bardugo, because it’s also epic fantasy, for young adults, and it has mythical creatures (like the stag and the firebird): it has dragons! The first book in my trilogy is called Sand and Smoke. Read more about it by clicking here.

The Seven Most Interesting Questions about Air Awakens, Elise Kova, Vhalla Yarl, Aldrik Solaris, and the Windwalker

Welcome! If you’re curious about this website, this is part of the Most Interesting Questions series on my blog. I answer the most interesting questions I can find or think of about bestselling franchises, and today I’m going to be covering Elise Kova’s Air Awakens series.

Air Awakens is an amazing series of magic books. The protagonist of the series is Vhalla Yarl, a Windwalker which means she can control one of the four elements: air. Air Awakens is also a romantic fantasy series, and Vhalla’s love interest is Aldrik. His full name is Aldrik Ci’Dan Solaris. He’s a Firebearer, which means he can control the element of fire. There are also Waterrunners and Groundbreakers.

Air Awakens is an indie fantasy series. For an Air Awakens age rating, I’d say it’s probably a great book for young adults, like teens. Younger kids might be able to enjoy aspects of it, but the last book in particular gets a bit gruesome at times. I also think that some of the things that the series deals with are best appreciated by those who are at least teenagers. I do think that adults could also enjoy the story. Anyone who loves magic books, fantasy books, young adult fantasy, indie fantasy, they’ll love it! The book is not very original with its magic system, but it is very well written.

By the way, if you’re wondering about who I am, I’m an author from Portland, OR. I write fantasy also, and if you liked Elise Kova’s books and are looking for another good read, I’d encourage you to check out Sand and Smoke, the first book in my Dragon Destiny trilogy, by clicking here.

Now, I’ll dive into the most interesting questions.

Q #1) Who are the Air Awakens characters?

The main character is Vhalla Yarl. She’s from the east, where Windwalkers originate from, though at the start of the first book there hasn’t been a Windwalker in over 200 years. Historically they’ve been hunted and exterminated. Vhalla’s going to change that.

By her side is Aldrik Ci’Dan Solaris. He’s the crown prince of the empire, and his father is the king, while his mother was the youngest princess of the west, before the west got conquered by the south and became part of the empire where this all takes place. His mother is also deceased, having passed away right after Aldrik was born.

Air Awakens‘ Laurel is Aldrik’s childhood friend. Like Aldrik, she’s a firebearer. Fritz is a waterrunner, who is close with Laurel and becomes a good friend to Vhalla too.

Air Awakens’ Baldair is the younger brother to Aldrik. They are half brothers, sharing the same father but they have different mothers. Baldair’s mother is not mentioned much in the books, though she is seen briefly in book 4. Baldair does not use magic.

Air Awakens’ Jax is part of Baldair’s golden guard. The golden guard is kinda like an elite group of soldiers whose charge it is to defend Baldair. He also gives them other missions frequently. The golden guard is filled with some really cool folks, in addition to Jax the guard includes Daniel, Erion, Craig, and others. Jax is a firebearer, most of the rest don’t use magic.

There are a lot of other great characters in Air Awakens, too many for me to name!

Q #2) Do Vhalla and Aldrik end up together?

Massive spoilers here. Stop reading if you don’t want to be spoiled.

Yes, they do end up together. It’s not easy, though. There are sacrifices they have to make…I won’t spoil those sacrifices here.

Q #3) Air Awakens series review, or how good are the books?

Okay, so everyone has their own opinion. But honestly, I feel that the first book is the best of the lot. It’s basically a romance, and there’s a love triangle, with magic thrown in. As the series continues on, it gets more into the action bit of things.

Book two is great as well. There is a huge, huge cliffhanger at the end of book two. So be warned. You’ll probably need to pick up book three immediately afterward. And book three is pretty darn good. Vhalla and Aldrik take their relationship to another level in this book. It’s really satisfying, and though there’s five books to the series in total, it does feel like their relationship reaches a climax in this book.

I thought book four was a bit of a mixed bag. The first half of the book is slow. The action isn’t as prevalent as it was in books two and three, and the romance disappears for a while also. Vhalla does learn a lot about her magic, and the way that magic works in her world. This is necessary for the conclusion of the series, so it’s something to be prepared for and you just have to get through it if you want to finish the series.

The latter half of book four picks up in an incredible way. There are a lot of surprising things that happen, I won’t spoil them.

Book five has its moments, but honestly I feel like it’s the weakest of the whole series. It’s definitely a different kind of book, because in the first four books Vhalla and Aldrik are constantly dealing with the struggle to be together, and there’s a tension: will they or won’t they end up together? First they’re exploring their relationship, then they’re fighting to be together. In book five, there’s none of that tension anymore. They’re together. There are other issues that crop up, big issues. But they’re not things that threaten Aldrik and Vhalla’s relationship, so this was a different kind of read for me.

Q #4) Can you list the Air Awakens series in order?

The first book in the series is obviously Air Awakens.

After that, it goes:

2. Fire Falling

3. Earth’s End

4. Water’s Wrath

5. Crystal Crowned

That wraps up the Air Awakens series, which follows Vhalla and Aldrik. However, there are also more series that Elise Kova has written, set in the same world. Air Awakens: Vortex Chronicles is about Vhalla and Aldrik’s daughter, Vi Solaris. It goes:

  1. Vortex Visions
  2. Chosen Champion
  3. Failed Future
  4. Sovereign Sacrifice
  5. Crystal Caged

Finally, there’s the Golden Guard Trilogy. This series is perfect to read after the first five books, the original Air Awakens series, for fans of Baldair’s golden guard. It goes:

  1. The Crown’s Dog
  2. The Prince’s Rogue
  3. The Farmer’s War

As of writing this, this is all Elise Kova has released in the Air Awakens universe. However, there is also a new series slated for release. The first book is called A Trial of Sorcerors and it’s due to come out March 4, 2021.

So as you can see, there are a lot of books in the Air Awakens universe. If you happen to have read them all already, or if you’re just looking for something new and different to entertain you, I invite you again to discover my Dragon Destiny trilogy. Book one is Sand and Smoke, click here.

The Six Most Interesting Questions about Djinn Tamer Bronze League, Derek Alan Siddoway, A.J. Cerna, and the Djinncyclopedia

Ultimately, I’d say, this would be a great book for those who get psyched when they think about reading a book about Pokemon.

Welcome! This post is part of my Most Interesting Questions series, which means I’ll be answering the most interesting questions I can find or think of on the Djinn Tamer series.

The Djinn Tamer series is an indie gem, written by Derek Alan Siddoway and A.J. Cerna. Djinn Tamer is exciting, action-packed, and it’s an indie fantasy and litrpg book series on Amazon. As the description on Amazon goes, it’s great for fans of Pokemon, Digimon, and Monster Rancher. It’s written by Derek Alan Siddoway and A.J. Cerna, Derek is the author behind the Teutevar Saga and the Gryphon Riders Trilogy which includes Windsworn, Windswept, and Windbreak. Both Derek and A.J. also recently released a new book called God Mode. It’s also a litrpg book. As for Djinn Tamer, the series includes three books called Djinn Tamer Starter, Djinn Tamer Rivals, and Djinn Tamer Evolution. All books are in the Djinn Tamer Bronze League trilogy, and coming up next is apparently going to be the Djinn Tamer Silver League.

By the way, if you’re wondering about who I am, I’m an author from Portland, OR. I write epic fantasy and children’s science fiction. Feel free to check out my books using the menu bar above!

Q #1) What is a Djinn Tamer? What is this book about?

A: A Djinn Tamer is basically a Pokemon trainer. Likewise, a Djinn is basically a Pokemon. In these books, Derek and A.J. have used their amazing imagination to craft a whole new set of Pokemon. The Djinn are really unique, really cool, and easy to love. The main character’s Djinn is basically like a dog or wolf that’s fiery red. Others are like jaguars or bird-like. Unlike in the video games and the cartoon, though, things are simplified a bit. There are only five types: Water, Fire, Wind, Earth, and Plain. Djinn also have stats similar to Pokemon…they don’t play a very big role in the narrative though. Since this is a litrpg book, the authors do list the stats out from time to time, so readers can track this.

Q #2) What is a djinncyclopedia, djinn encyclopedia, or djinn tamer encyclopedia?

A: The Djinncyclopedia is basically the equivalent of a Pokedex. In this series, the main character, Jackson Hunt, gets one straight away (or maybe he has one to start things off, I can’t quite remember). The Djinncyclopedia shows Djinn Tamers information about wild Djinn, their own Djinn, and other tamers’ Djinn. It lets them see stuff like their stats, a description, and the names of the various Djinn they encounter. When it comes to other tamers, though, the encyclopedia does hide some information about their Djinn, so that in the middle of a fight it can’t be used to give one tamer an edge over the other. By the way, Derek and A.J. have an online Djinncyclopedia that can be viewed by anyone who signs up for their mailing list. Here is the link: http://djinntamer.com/newsletter/

Q # 3) When is the Djinn Tamer book 4 release date?

A: As far as I know, there’s no news right now on a Djinn Tamer book 4 release date. One might assume that news of it will be emailed to those signed up for their mailing list. Of course, book 4 will be part of the Djinn Tamer Silver League, given that Bronze League is finished. In the meantime, interested readers will have to check out other books while they wait for Djinn Tamer book 4’s release date. I am an author myself who writes in the same genre and who writes books that are similar in feel to Djinn Tamer. I’d like to shamelessly plug my book Sand and Smoke and my upcoming series Dragons of Marak to anyone who’s looking for a new, exciting read! They aren’t litrpg but they are fantasy with action scenes. Check out Sand and Smoke here: https://rebrand.ly/sandandsmoke.

Q #4) Is there a Djinn Tamer wiki out there?

A: I really think there should be a Djinn Tamer wiki. It’s definitely a series that deserves it. It would be great to have a place to look up information quickly about the different Djinns, and see what they look like. Sadly, I haven’t been able to find a wiki page online for it. Perhaps one will appear in the future. In the meantime, the Djinncyclopedia is probably the closest thing to it, that’s my guess.

Q #5) Is Djinn Tamer a ripoff of Pokemon?

A: This question actually comes from the Amazon reviews. There’s a lot of reviews on Amazon that state this series is a rip-off of Pokemon. It’s easy to see why, after having read the books. The story is super similar, down to a main character who mirrors Ash Ketchum in many ways and a world that resembles Pokemon in almost all aspects; there’s just different names for things. This, I believe, is mostly by design from the authors. It’s definitely not a book for anyone who wants to read something unique, that hasn’t been thought of before! There are books out there like that, books that take something familiar, and put a new spin on it. I usually try to do that with my books. Djinn Tamer instead is for anyone who loves Pokemon and wants to read Pokemon. It excels in bringing that old-timey Pokemon (weird that I’m calling Pokemon old-timey) feel to literature. It doesn’t necessarily bring something new to the table, rather, it delivers something that many people around the world remember fondly to them in a new format, as a book.

Q #6): Who is the main character?

A: Jackson Hunt is the main character. He’s a Djinn Tamer from a small town, just like Ash Ketchum! In fact, Jackson Hunt is a spitting image of Ash Ketchum in many ways. He’s definitely not for everyone. He’s got a lot of teen angst, but on the other hand he does seem to have a good heart. He wants, more than anything, to be a Djinn Tamer in the pro leagues. Ultimately, I’d say, this would be a great book for those who get psyched when they think about reading a book about Pokemon, but for others there are probably better options out there. Overall, it does serve a niche, quite nicely I think, because there aren’t many books out there that evoke that old-timey Pokemon feel like Djinn Tamer does.

Thanks for reading! Now I invite you to check out more MIQ posts below, or my book Sand and Smoke, which is also fantasy, with lots of action and lovable characters. It has dragons, a ragtag criminal crew, and a devastating weapon that must be stopped.

The Eight Most Interesting Questions about The Wings of War, Child of the Daystar, Bryce O’Connor, and Raz i’Syul Arro

Welcome! This post is part of my Most Interesting Questions series, which means I’ll be answering the most interesting questions I can find or think of on The Wings of War series by Bryce O’Connor. This is a series where I cover the most interesting questions I can find about various bestselling books, TV shows, or movies.

This post covers The Wings of War by Bryce O’Connor. It starts with Child of the Daystar, and it’s a bestselling Kindle Unlimited fantasy series for adults. In my opinion, it’s one of the best self-published fantasy series on Amazon. The characters are great. The main character is Raz i’Syul Arro, an atherian which basically means a lizard man. That’s right, this is a kindle unlimited book about a lizard man. And he has wings.

By the way, if you’re wondering about who I am, I’m an author from Portland, OR. I write epic fantasy and children’s science fiction. Check out my books here. Since I do mostly write for younger audiences, I should warn that this series has some pretty graphic scenes, so be warned. I’ve left details of those graphic scenes out of this blog post, but if you crack open the books you’ll certainly find them.

At the time of writing this, the series is being read voraciously. The first book alone has over 800 ratings on Amazon. But there still aren’t a lot of questions online about it, so I’m creating my own most interesting questions.

At present, I’ve only read the first 3 books: Child of the Daystar, The Warring Son, and Winter’s King, so before you read below be warned you may encounter spoilers from any of those books. Even though five books have been released in the Wings of War series at the time I’m writing this, As Iron Falls and Of Sand and Snow aren’t covered because I haven’t read them.

WingsOfWar

 

Q #1) What do the other atherians think about Raz?

A: In the first book, O’Connor mentions that winged atherians are rare. Raz is a winged atherian. He also mentions that winged atherians tend to rule over other atherians, often have multiple mates, and are very territorial. I’d therefore assume that Raz could encounter a few different types of other atherians: female atherians, male atherians without wings, and male atherians with wings. Female atherians probably would view him as powerful, and they’d probably stay near him for his protection. Males without wings would probably steer clear of him, recognizing he’s much more powerful than them, or they might agree to serve him if they desired protection. Regardless, those without wings, both males and females, would likely steer clear of trouble with Raz. They’d probably view him as superior in strength, just because he has wings. Males with wings would likely challenge him if he got too close to their territory, otherwise, they would probably just view him as a neighbor and leave him alone. If they knew he consorted so much with humans, any atherian would probably be confused, since they generally live apart from humans. They might view him as weaker for that, but we don’t have too much information on how atherians view humans so maybe not.

Q #2) Could Quin Tern have possibly survived, since Raz didn’t kill him he just left him in the cold?

A: Yes. I think he could have. But did he? I doubt it. I do find it interesting how O’Connor chose to not show his death. It means Tern could always make a reappearance. But he would have to be really lucky to survive the cold without a coat, like Raz left him. If Quin Tern did survive, I think he’ll come back a new, much more dangerous man. He was pretty foolish with Raz in book 2. If he survives, he’ll become as changed as Raz became after his family was murdered by the slavers.

Q #3) How many atherians are there?

A: Good question! I think there are less atherians than humans. Given their biology, atherians wouldn’t want to live in the north. We know that they trade occasionally with the caravans in the Cienbal. But they don’t trade all that often, it seems, because most of the trade in the first book happens between different human caravans. Based on the map, it appears they would have to occupy a pretty small land area to stay clear of humans so often. But how densely packed is that area? It’s hard to say. Ultimately, I don’t think they’d number less than several hundred thousand. But they might number as many as a couple million.

Q #4) Who would win in a fight between Raz and Kaladin Stormblessed?

A: These two are some of my favorite characters so I had to wonder about this. If you’re not familiar with Kaladin, he’s a protagonist in Brandon Sanderson’s Stormlight Archive series. Ultimately, his advantage in this battle would be his speed and lashing ability. With his lashing ability, he could maneuver around large swaths of land much faster than Raz. Raz, meanwhile, probably has a better reaction time, and he is definitely physically stronger. If they were forced to fight in close range combat, I think Raz could take Kaladin down. If they had a large battlefield, Kaladin would have an advantage. Regardless, it would be a hard fought battle. Both have incredible intelligence in the midst of battle. They’re super resourceful, and know how to win against the odds. So it’s hard to say who would win. Ultimately, Raz probably has a little more experience in one-on-one battles, and fighting alone. If Kaladin had the help of Bridge Four, he’d get a huge boost, whereas if Raz had any help, it’d probably make less of a difference cause he’s such a solo fighter.

Q #5) How do the Priests use magic? Is it something that Raz could ever learn? Or something that someone else in the world could learn and abuse?

A: I don’t think this is ever even hinted at. But it seems like the priests get their magic from Laor after they become a priest. The most plausible explanation to me seems to be some item that gives them the power, and if that’s true then new priests would be granted the item’s power when they are initiated. Given that nobody else in the world seems capable of magic, it doesn’t seem like something humans have the ability to learn, rather, it seems like something they must be gifted. Raz could maybe be gifted the power too, if his atherian blood doesn’t interfere with his ability to accept it, but I doubt the priests would ever give him that power willingly. Raz isn’t the type to take it for no reason either. Raz might take it if he had a strong reason.

Q #6) Will Raz ever master flight?

A: I think he has to. We saw him successfully fly at the end of Child of the Daystar. He didn’t actually fly in Winter’s King, but for a moment it seemed like he did. Ultimately, he’s gotta master it since he has wings, and we already saw him do it once so we know it’s possible.

Q #7): What lies north of Cyurgi’Di?

A: According to the map, just the tundra. A tundra is a vast, flat, treeless region where the subsoil is permanently frozen. There could be penguins or polar bears up in the tundra north of Cyurgi’Di. There could also be humans, like eskimos. Ultimately, it seems kind of like a Greenland situation to me. There’s probably not much north of Cyurgi’Di.

Q #8): What did all the bounty hunters who showed up in Azbar after Raz left do?

A: After Raz left, those bounty hunters likely left too. It’s unclear if they would know where Raz was going. Obviously, we know he went up to Ystred. But the bounty hunters wouldn’t have known that. I think they all probably did different things. Maybe a couple stayed in Azbar or went back home. Most were probably pretty set on the bounty from Raz, so they would have tried to follow him. They would probably figure that he wasn’t going south again, since there was so much money on his head. Most of the bounty hunters probably went up to Ystred, but arrived after Raz had already left the town with Talo and Carro. A few might have thought Raz was going to Drangstek, but it’s farther away from Azbar than Ystred is, so it would be a less likely next destination for him. Most probably went to Ystred, but arrived too late to catch Raz.

Thanks for reading! Now I invite you to check out more MIQ posts below, or my book Sand and Smoke, which also is fantasy, with lots of action and lovable characters. It doesn’t feature lizard people, but it does feature dragons. Big, flying dragons. Both the eastern and the western kind.

One Last MIQ: The six most interesting questions I missed (Part 2)

I’ve decided to retire the MIQ blog…and to convert it.

Welcome! This post is part of my Most Interesting Questions series, which means I’ll be answering the most interesting questions I can find or think of. This post will focus on a variety of different novels and franchises.

By the way, if you’re wondering about who I am, I’m an author from Portland, OR. I write epic fantasy and children’s science fiction.

Being that it’s early in my author career, things are very fluid. Therefore, my blog is going to be changing a little after this post.

Instead of exclusively answering the most interesting questions about various bestsellers, I’m going to focus this blog on my day to day author activities too. And possibly I’ll highlight other things in my life. Mostly, I’ll keep the blog writing related.

One part of that conversion will be accepting review requests. Over the last year, I’ve read a few indie published novels, and reviewed them on Amazon. However, in attempting to gather reviews for my own books, I’ve come to appreciate just how hard it can be, especially when starting out, to get those reviews.

So if you are an author, feel free to request a review of your novel. One thing I won’t be doing is creating a book blog. I leave that to those more skilled than I. But I like reading and would not mind helping some indie authors out with getting reviews on Amazon, Goodreads, Barnes&Noble, Bookbub, etc. If you’re not an author, just ignore that little plug. Instead, you could check out my books.

Now, I’ll get to my last MIQ blog post. This post covers Percy Jackson, Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of KorraMistborn, and Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy, among other works.

BooksForFinalMIQ

Q#1: If you could add anything to Camp Half-Blood, anything, rules, places, items, etc., what would you add?

A: Honestly, probably more interaction with the gods. I know it’s not in greek mythology for them to interact with their kids more, but I feel like they should do it, so many of the kids just get abandoned and not claimed. Or at least maybe there should be a movement from some of the campers or counselors to try and convince the gods to do that.

Q#2: Who would win in a fight, Katara or Amon?

A: Probably Amon. But it depends. As we know Katara can bloodbend on the full moon. Amon can blood bend any time he wants. So if it’s not the full moon, then Amon wins. But if it is, then they are both blood benders. Would one be stronger than the other? And though Amon has bloodbent more than Katara, Katara probably has just as much fighting experience as him, and there would be more to their fight than just bloodbending if their bloodbending cancelled each other out. So if it was a full moon, I could see Katara winning the fight.

Q #3: Which kind of Twinborn would you most prefer to be (Mistborn)?

A: Honestly I think it would be awesome to be able to fly, so I would like to be a Coinshot for one of my abilities. Then for the other one I would probably take the steel feruchemical ability, and be a Steelrunner too. That would strengthen my abilities too because they both use the same metal.

Q #4: Do I have to read the Mistborn trilogy to get Wax&Wayne?

A: I would say no. Brandon Sanderson repeats a lot of how the magic system and the world works in the beginning of his books. So if you hadn’t read Mistborn, you would still understand Wax&Wayne. However, that said, I believe you will appreciate Wax&Wayne a lot more if you read Mistborn first. Because there are a lot of things that carry over. It is kind of like cookies and milk. You can drink milk without cookies, and you can eat cookies without milk, but they taste better together.

Q #5: Which one is your favorite character in Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy?

A: In Book 1, I loved reading Grigori’s chapters, and I also loved reading about Ethel. In book 2, my favorites were probably Daisy and Lloyd. In book 3, I actually really came to appreciate Dimka and I would say Walli, but just at the beginning of the book. It’s hard to narrow it down even that far. But if I had to choose a favorite character overall, it would probably be Daisy. Just because her character changes so much, and in such a great way, and I really think she is probably the most well-written character in the entire series.

Q #6: Who is your favorite fictional dragon from books?

A: I love Sapphira from Eragon. Maybe I am biased because she is one of the first dragons I read about in a book, back in 6th grade. But she is really human at heart, she’s not just some wild creature or an all-knowing godlike creature, she interacts and converses in meaningful ways with the world, and has a magnetic personality. Aside from Sapphira, I also love Cuicao from my own books. She’s the dragon partner in Sand and SmokeI guess it’s cheating to choose my own character, though.

The Seven Most Interesting Questions about the TV show The 100

Welcome! This post is part of my Most Interesting Questions series, which means I’ll be answering the most interesting questions I can find or think of on the TV show The 100The 100 is a dystopian sci-fi show and it has seven total seasons, which means there isn’t a season 8, there is a season 7 and a season 6, however. Those two seasons together really bring the series to a conclusion. The 100 is also a series of books by Kass Morgan, the first of which was published in 2013. This post is about the TV series. There are breaks below so that you can avoid spoilers if you haven’t seen certain episodes yet. This post was written after season 6 aired but before season 7 aired.

By the way, if you’re wondering about who I am, I’m an author from Portland, OR. Many of my books would also be great reads for any fan of The 100, feel free to check them out using the menu above!

Here are the most interesting questions about The 100.

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Q #1: What do you think of The 100 and its underlying message?

A: I personally love the show! However, it is definitely not for everyone. At times, the writers make some questionable and sometimes disappointing decisions (I do feel like it could be a bit more friendly to its diverse characters) and also there is quite a bit of violence, so if you’re looking for something clean this isn’t it. However, it does do a really good job of creating tension, high stakes, and the characters never get off easy.

*———-*
* SPOILERS FROM SEASONS 1-5 BELOW *
If you haven’t watched seasons 1-5 yet, you’ll encounter spoilers if you read on. No spoilers from season 6 will be in the next few questions, however.

*———-*

 

 

Q #2: In The 100, if grounders are supposedly the survivors of the nuclear war in the second Dawn Bunker who were allowed to leave the bunker due to Becca’s Nightblood serum, how did their descendants without Nightblood survive?

A: In a similar way to how the sky people survived. In the show, they explain that those on the ark have adapted, after absorbing radiation in space, to those radiation levels. Similarly, those on earth have adapted to the new radiation levels on earth. If I remember correctly, they represent this with a dial that goes from green to yellow to red. Those on Mount Weather are protected from all radiation, they haven’t adapted at all. They can only survive in the green. The grounders and the sky people, who have evolved and adapted, can survive in the yellow. But only nightbloods can survive in the red, the most lethal level of radiation. At the time of The 100, radiation levels on earth are in the yellow. Presumably, maybe some of the nightblood genes didn’t get passed on completely, and/or humans started evolving away from being nightbloods, when radiation levels fell back down into the yellow.

Q #3: When will The 100 season 6 be shown in the UK?

A: I had to do a quick search for this one. It looks like it’s going to be shown starting September 4th, 2019, at 9pm on channel E4. Source: https://www.geektown.co.uk/tvairdates/the-100/

*———-*
* SPOILERS FROM SEASON 6 BELOW *
If you haven’t watched season 6 yet, you’ll encounter spoilers if you read on.

*———-*

 

Q #4: In The 100, does Madi have access to all of Lexa’s memories of Clarke?

A: Yes, while she has the flame in. However, now that the flame is out, she doesn’t have access anymore. One interesting thing to think about, at least for me, is how memory works. If I watch something like a home movie, then I will later have a memory of watching it, and because of that, a memory of the event I watched too. Similarly, if Madi were to have accessed Lexa’s memories, before she lost the flame, could she still recall those memories she accessed later on? It would make sense that this was possible, meaning that Madi, and probably Clarke too, still have access to memories from the flame, even if they don’t have it anymore.

Q #5: What happened to Octavia in The 100?

A: What we saw was that she was taken by the anomaly. And the anomaly spit out Diyoza’s daughter. Beyond that, it’s a question that we’ll have to wait until season 7 to have answered. However, my theory is that Octavia was allowed to leave by the anomaly, and that it was actually supposed to be Diyoza’s daughter who left. Octavia was only allowed to leave because she had unresolved business (either her part to play in taking down the primes, or making amends with Bellamy). Either way, once she had accomplished that, the anomaly took things back to how they were supposed to be. But still, what is the anomaly exactly? And how has Diyoza’s daughter already grown up, while Octavia is still the same age? There must be some sort of time travel involved, I think. Whatever is happening, it must have to do with whoever created the anomaly.

Q #6: Will there be aliens in season 7?

A: Very possibly. Based on the events of what the anomaly is doing and is capable of, it seems like aliens must be behind it. And technically, we have already seen aliens. The bugs on Planet Alpha are aliens. However, they are not intelligent life, at least as far as we know.

Q #7: Why is Murphy not affected by the Red Sun eclipse psychosis on The 100?

A: I think he’s still affected. He just conquers it quickly. We see him at one point sitting with the guns, taking deep breaths, trying to convince himself everything is going to be okay. The Red Sun, gets to him, however…

Murphy also deals with a ton of self-destructive thoughts on a daily basis, when the Red Sun is not around. We’ve seen him evolve from a season 1 psychopath to a guy who actually, usually, tries to do the right thing. So he’s learned over time how to deal with what the Red Sun presents him with. Others in the group haven’t ever had those thoughts, and so it’s harder for them to combat them. He’s not immune, he’s just learned to fight it.

Thanks for reading! Now I invite you to check out more MIQ posts below, or my book Sand and Smoke, which is an epic fantasy novel for young adults. If you liked The 100, and if you enjoy reading fantasy, then I think you would love it! It has lovable characters, a ragtag group of criminals, and lots of dragons in it.

The Six Most Interesting Questions about Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom

At BookCon 2019, Bardugo said that for the first season of the TV show, they are going to be combining the first Six of Crows book with the first Shadow and Bone book.

Welcome! This post is part of my Most Interesting Questions series, which means I’ll be answering the most interesting questions I can find or think of on Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo. The Six of Crows characters are some of the most lovable in epic fantasy, in my opinion. Leigh Bardugo wrote Shadow and Bone first; it takes place in the same world as Six of Crows, but many people start reading at Six of Crows first. There is a Netflix series coming up. These two books are duology, which means that there are only two books in the series, though there may be a Six of Crows book 3 coming at some point in time, more on that lower down the page.

By the way, if you’re wondering about who I am, I’m an author from Portland, OR. I write epic fantasy and children’s science fiction.

Here are the most interesting questions about the Six of Crows duology:

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Q #1: As a beginner in fantasy novels is Six of Crows a good read?

A: Yes, it’s a great read for a beginner! It’s a YA novel and the writing is easy to understand. I read it fairly quick, in about a week. It’s also an engaging story, with a cool magic system, and Bardugo does an excellent job of plotting the novel so that the twists and turns feel real and surprising.

Q #2: Who is your favorite point of view to read from in Six of Crows?

A: Definitely Inej or Kaz. I like reading Kaz’s chapters because he’s such a well-rounded character and has a dark side to him that other characters don’t have. He takes everything super seriously, and as the leader of the gang he usually deals with the problems that have the most stakes, so his chapters often feel like the most productive and important. Inej, on the other hand, is interesting simply because she’s the Wraith. She doesn’t have darkness inside her like Kaz does, but she can accomplish things no one else can, and like Kaz, she takes everything seriously. Because she often can’t be replaced on missions, her chapters feel critical.

Q #3: What happened to Nina after Leigh Bardugo’s Crooked Kingdom?

A: I’m going to try to answer this without giving away spoilers. Nina undergoes some changes in Crooked Kingdom, if you’ve read the book you will know what those changes are. It’s partially explained, but not completely. Presumably, she is going to find out more about that because of where she’s going by the end of the book. It seems like we’d need a third book to really get a conclusion to what happens to Nina, as beyond some surface level stuff, these changes have not really been explained.

Q #4: Is there a third book of Six of Crows series by Leigh Bardugo?

A: Right now there’s not! It just goes 1. Six of Crows 2. Crooked Kingdom. However, I was at BookCon 2019 and attended a panel where Leigh Bardugo spoke about the books. One of the things she did address was the possibility of a third book. She said that she’s always imagined writing a third book, and would like to, but that her schedule is packed right now with other projects. She said that if we (the fans) are still around in a few years and interested in a third book she would write it. So presumably there will be a third book in a few years, as long as the series’ popularity doesn’t unexpectedly plummet. In the meantime, I’d like to shamelessly plug my own book Sand and SmokeIt’s also an epic fantasy book, but set in a world with dragons, and like Six of Crows it follows a group of criminals, but in it they seek to stop a devastating weapon.

Q #5: Are the main characters in Six of Crows bad people (like Kaz Brekker) or are they normal people in unlucky situations?

A: I think whether or not they’re bad people is subjective. One of the things Bardugo does a great job of is showcasing how bad the world these characters live in is. Compared to the rest of the Barrel, Kaz and his crew are like saints. Compared to most people that you or I encounter on the planet earth, they’re not so great. But I think what still makes them likeable characters is that they were just normal people who found themselves in unlucky situations. And those unlucky situations have led them to become bad. But each of these characters wouldn’t be bad if the world hadn’t been bad to them first.

Q #6: Will Six of Crows be made into a movie?

A: It’s not going to be made into a movie, as far as I’m aware. However, it is in the process of being made into a Netflix TV series. When I was at BookCon 2019, Leigh Bardugo also spoke some about this. She said that she’s been very involved in the process (she’s an executive producer) and she sounded really pleased about who they cast in the lead roles (it sounded like they had already cast the lead roles, though she did not name any names and as far as I’m aware it’s not been made public). She also mentioned they were doing something unique with the TV series. At BookCon 2019, Bardugo said that for the first season of the TV show, they are going to be combining the first Six of Crows book with the first Shadow and Bone book. She sounded very confident that the decision to combine the books into one for the TV show is going to work out great, though I myself am curious to see how it’s going to work given that they take places at different times.

Thanks for reading! Now I invite you to check out more MIQ posts below, or my book Sand and Smoke, which is also an epic fantasy, with lots of action and a ragtag group of criminals, and draws inspiration from Six of Crows in some ways. Sand and Smoke also features a bunch of dragons, and I had a blast researching dragon mythology for the book! It’s going to be a trilogy.

Six Most Interesting Questions about Isaac Asimov’s Foundation series

Welcome! This post is part of my Most Interesting Questions series, which means I’ll be answering the most interesting questions I can find or think of on Isaac Asimov’s Foundation series. Pictured below are the first three books in the series, but there are many more books. Foundation spans many generations, covering a history of somewhere around 1000 years. The second book is called Second Foundation and the third is called Foundation and Empire. There isn’t a movie as far as I’m aware, but Apple TV is working on a Foundation TV series. I can’t wait! Foundation is one of the best gems that Asimov has given the world, in my opinion.

By the way, if you’re wondering about who I am, I’m an author from Portland, OR. I write epic fantasy and children’s science fiction.

Foundation

Q #1: What do people think of the Foundation series by Isaac Asimov?

A: I can’t speak for other people, but I think it’s great. It’s a sci-fi series, probably primarily meant for adults, but can be read by advanced readers in high school also imho. One of the things Asimov does really well is to create a compelling story on an epic timescale. The first book alone spans multiple generations.

Q #2: Are there overlaps between the western roman empire’s decline and Isaac Asimov’s Foundation?

A: YES. And it’s in all-caps because I think that is the parallel for this whole thing. The roman empire, like the empire in Foundation, is far-reaching, encompassing almost all of Europe. It breaks up in pieces, similar to how the empire breaks up in Foundation. And after the break-up, there comes a dark ages, similar to the medieval times in Europe. The main difference is that the empire in Foundation is the roman empire on a massive scale. This is highlighted by the fact that The Foundation will enable the empire to recover in a thousand years, but without it the empire could take 30,000 years to recover.

Q #3: Is the story of Interstellar similar to the story of the Foundation by Isaac Asimov?

A: No. I think they are completely different. Interstellar is a story about space, and about family. Foundation is a story about the entire human race, and a crumbling space empire. The only real similarity is that they can both be classified as science fiction, but there the similarities end.

Q #4: How realistic is a predictive science of psychohistory, a la Hari Seldon in Isaac Asimov’s Foundation series?

A: Just fyi, I have little to no real life experience that would inform an answer to this. However, after reading the book, and based on what I know, I would say that it’s fairly unrealistic. Hari Seldon is able to predict events with eerie accuracy, and I don’t think this would be possible. In particular, I don’t think it would be possible to pinpoint the exact years that things would happen. Obviously, it is inevitable that a grand empire will fall. Everything comes to an end eventually. So it is believable that Hari Seldon would predict that. But how could he know it will happen so soon? I think psychohistory could definitely exist right now, and in the future, to predict future events, but I don’t think it could predict nearly as much or nearly as accurately as it does in Foundation.

Q #5: What similarities and differences does Donald Trump have with Isaac Asimov’s character The Mule from the book Foundation and Empire?

A: I would say they actually have surprising amount in common. Donald Trump’s presidency was unexpected. And he’s done a lot to alter the direction of our country. The Mule is similarly an unexpected force thrown into the mix, and he also alters the direction that the Foundation is so carefully attempting to guide humanity in. The difference between them is that the whole reason The Mule is able to do what he can do is because he has a superhuman ability to manipulate people. Donald Trump doesn’t have that ability, though it might seem like it at times with how readily people dismiss what he’s doing and support him. Donald Trump also comes from wealth, and was already a public figure before his presidency. The Mule was just an ordinary person who used his mutant abilities to rise through the ranks.

Q #6: Without spoiling the book, what is Isaac Asimov’s Foundation about?

A: Isaac Asimov’s Foundation is about the fall of a galactic empire. It’s about the people from a single planet called The Foundation. Before the collapse of the empire, a man who predicts its fall establishes The Foundation with the goal of guiding humanity through the dark ages after the fall of the galactic empire, and to the bright new days of a second galactic empire. It spans many generations, as the whole process will take a thousand years.

Thanks for reading! Now I invite you to check out more MIQ posts below, or my books. I write mostly in epic fantasy and children’s science fiction, so it may be more juvenile than Foundation, but it could still be a great read for you if you like stuff with lighter tones.

Seven Most Interesting Questions about A Wrinkle in Time

This kind of behavior quickly leads to a society that is conditioned to all do the same things, all act the same way, all think the same way, and run the same way, like a machine.

Welcome! This post is part of my Most Interesting Questions series, which means I’ll be answering the most interesting questions I can find or think of on Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time. The A Wrinkle in Time book is part of the larger A Wrinkle in Time series. It was also made into a movie in 2003. The main characters are Meg Murry, Calvin O’Keefe, and Charles Wallace Murry, Meg’s little brother. A Wrinkle in Time is really a good read, and ahead of its time (it was published back in 1962). Here are the most interesting questions about Madeleine L’Engle’s famous series:

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Q #1: Is the novel A Wrinkle in Time worth reading?

A: Yes. Well, I would say yes depending on what type of books you like. A Wrinkle in Time is science fiction, and it’s a children’s book, though I think it could be enjoyed by teens also. Adults might like it as light reading, it’s a great story, though the story is more in line with what a child or teen might enjoy, in my opinion.

Q #2: What’s your favourite line in A Wrinkle in Time?

A: This is a great question! There are lots of great lines. However, one that sticks with me is Mrs. Whatsit’s last line in the first chapter. She just says casually: “there is such a thing as a tesseract” and it completely draws you in and makes you want to read the rest of the book.

Q #3: In A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle the protagonists encounter a city where everything runs on a schedule and is controlled by a nefarious machine if memory serves. If you read the book what was your impression?

A: This is one of the best parts in my opinion. Most obviously, it’s a warning that uniformity is the enemy of freedom. But also, that is just the surface-level meaning. Given the time this book was published, smack dab in the middle of the cold war, I think it’s likely this was an analogy for the dangers of communism. However, in present day it’s easy to see these dangers popping up in the capitalist world too. Given the connectivity of everyone, and the booming population, people have become more like a number than ever before, and big corporations are plugging them into a pipeline where everything runs on schedule and everyone is expected to act in a uniform machine-like manner. Beyond this, social media and the connectiveness of the world has made it easier than ever to quickly learn what is popular and what is not. People post on Facebook en-masse about TV shows like Game of Thrones, and then more people go to watch Game of Thrones because everyone else is posting about it, and then they post about it, and the cycle continues. It’s great for popular shows like Game of Thrones (and this isn’t a commentary on that show, it’s just a recent example of this I’ve seen) but this kind of behavior quickly leads to a society that is conditioned to all do the same things, all act the same way, all think the same way, and run the same way, like a machine.

Q #4: What is the worst book to movie inaccuracy in A Wrinkle in Time (2018)?

A: In my opinion, the worst inaccuracy has to do with the tone of the movie. Hollywood made it all about adventure and action. There was a point in the movie when I remember Meg and Calvin running away from the It, in a sort of chase that I distinctly remember didn’t happen. They also had another scene where Meg goes riding on the backs of these giant green things that didn’t belong. Adventure and action isn’t bad, necessarily, but it wasn’t the point of the book. The book had a lot of messages about society, about culture, about family, about growing up, and these were sacrificed to make a movie that was essentially a fun romp through a wrinkle in time.

Q #5: Is the book A Wrinkle in Time for teens (15y)?

A: Yes, I think it absolutely can be a great book for teens! It’s usually targeted at middle grade, which is ages 8-12, but I believe it could easily appeal to a teen as well.

Q #6: Is A Wrinkle in Time considered to be a children’s book?

A: Yes. It’s great for kids ages 8 and up!

Q #7: Is it possible to tether (teleport) just like characters from the movie A Wrinkle in Time?

A: I would say not that we know of. Of course, in A Wrinkle in Time, the three women who show Meg how to tesser are all otherwordly beings. Their knowledge surpasses our own. Even fifty or more years after the book was written, I would have to say that we don’t know enough about the universe to know whether or not tessering is possible. With our current technology, we can’t do it. However, with all of the laws of the universe we know, as far as I am aware, we can’t rule it out as possible.

Thanks for reading! Now I invite you to check out more MIQ posts below, or my books. I am an author of epic fantasy and children’s science fiction from Portland, OR. If you liked A Wrinkle in Time, you may very well enjoy one of my pieces,which I worked very hard on.

Four Most Interesting Questions about Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy

One of the things I really enjoyed about the first two books in The Century Trilogy was seeing life and the struggles of ordinary people in world wars 1 & 2.

Welcome! This post is part of my Most Interesting Questions series, which means I’ll be answering the most interesting questions I can find or think of on Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy. This post is a little different than my usual posts. I’m veering away from sci-fi/fantasy this month to look at a trilogy of historical fiction books. These are Ken Follett books, and they are really good in my opinion. The first book is called Fall of Giants. As of writing this, there is not a Fall of Giants movie, or a The Century Trilogy movie, but there may be one in the future! The second book is called Winter of the World, and it is the best book of the three in my opinion. All of the books follow a couple different families, through the century. There is even a Century Trilogy family tree you can probably find online, and in some of the books.

By the way, if you’re wondering about who I am, I’m an author from Portland, OR. I write epic fantasy and have dabbled in children’s science fiction.

Anyway, let’s get to the Ken Follett books. Here are the most interesting questions about The Century Trilogy.

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Q #1: How historically accurate are Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy novels?

A: I’d say they are very historically accurate. I have a friend who is a history buff and he’s the one who recommended them to me. I don’t think he would have done so if they weren’t historically accurate. Also, Ken Follett puts a little disclaimer in the back of all the books. In each of them he uses a mixture of fiction characters with real characters. He only places the real characters in situations or locations where they either are known to have been at a specific time, or could have been at a specific time according to public knowledge. Ken Follett also consults experts on the various time periods he writes about – you can see who he consults in the acknowledgements section at the back of each book.

Q #2: Did anyone make a movie about Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy?

A: Not yet, as far as I am aware. However, according to Ken Follett’s website, Sony Pictures and ABC are working on making it into a TV series: https://ken-follett.com/faq/

Q #3: Are the British culture & government really as stagnant & stubborn as depicted in Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy?

A: I’ll do my best to answer this, though I don’t live in Britain, and have only been once, when I studied abroad from January-May in college. During that time, I didn’t really get to know a whole lot about British politics, so most of what I do know comes from films or other books I’ve read, which may or may not be accurate. I do remember seeing the film Darkest Hour a year or so ago, which seemed to depict a similarly stagnant and stubborn political landscape. In it, Winston Churchill has to fight tooth and nail against politicians who don’t want to go to war against the Nazis. Since I live in America, I know a lot more about American politics, and I will say that many of our politicians are stagnant & stubborn, so I don’t think those are necessarily traits unique to British politicians. In America it seems like every other day one politician or another is saying that something is too ambitious or radical to be passed, and we should aim for a more moderate solution. I think part of that is the nature of good politics, the other part might be some sort of selfishness or greed. The argument for things being stagnant is that if change happens too fast there’s a risk it can be the wrong sort of change. The government has a responsibility to make sure its people are cared for, and if something changes that makes things worse for the people, it can be worse than no change at all, especially if the people are already generally well cared for.

Q #4: What are your thoughts on Ken Follett’s The Century Trilogy?

A: I think it is a solid read! The characters are very easy to relate to, and the history is written in a really appealing and educational way. However, I do feel that the third book in the trilogy was a little too spectacular. One of the things I really enjoyed about the first two books in The Century Trilogy was seeing life and the struggles of ordinary people in world wars 1 & 2. By the third book, a lot of these ordinary people have produced extraordinary children, and at times things that happened seemed cheesy or too convenient to happen in real life.

Thanks for reading! Now I invite you to check out more MIQ posts below, or my books. If you enjoy epic fantasy or children’s books, you might find something you like.