Most Interesting Questions about Bestsellers

Seven Most Interesting Questions about A Wrinkle in Time

This kind of behavior quickly leads to a society that is conditioned to all do the same things, all act the same way, all think the same way, and run the same way, like a machine.

WrinkleInTime

Q #1: Is the novel A Wrinkle in Time worth reading?

A: Yes. Well, I would say yes depending on what type of books you like. A Wrinkle in Time is science fiction, and it’s a children’s book, though I think it could be enjoyed by teens also. Adults might like it as light reading, it’s a great story, though the story is more in line with what a child or teen might enjoy, in my opinion.

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Q #2: What’s your favourite line in A Wrinkle in Time?

A: This is a great question! There are lots of great lines. However, one that sticks with me is Mrs. Whatsit’s last line in the first chapter. She just says casually: “there is such a thing as a tesseract” and it completely draws you in and makes you want to read the rest of the book.

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Q #3: In A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle the protagonists encounter a city where everything runs on a schedule and is controlled by a nefarious machine if memory serves. If you read the book what was your impression?

A: This is one of the best parts in my opinion. Most obviously, it’s a warning that uniformity is the enemy of freedom. But also, that is just the surface-level meaning. Given the time this book was published, smack dab in the middle of the cold war, I think it’s likely this was an analogy for the dangers of communism. However, in present day it’s easy to see these dangers popping up in the capitalist world too. Given the connectivity of everyone, and the booming population, people have become more like a number than ever before, and big corporations are plugging them into a pipeline where everything runs on schedule and everyone is expected to act in a uniform machine-like manner. Beyond this, social media and the connectiveness of the world has made it easier than ever to quickly learn what is popular and what is not. People post on Facebook en-masse about TV shows like Game of Thrones, and then more people go to watch Game of Thrones because everyone else is posting about it, and then they post about it, and the cycle continues. It’s great for popular shows like Game of Thrones (and this isn’t a commentary on that show, it’s just a recent example of this I’ve seen) but this kind of behavior quickly leads to a society that is conditioned to all do the same things, all act the same way, all think the same way, and run the same way, like a machine.

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Q #4: What is the worst book to movie inaccuracy in A Wrinkle in Time (2018)?

A: In my opinion, the worst inaccuracy has to do with the tone of the movie. Hollywood made it all about adventure and action. There was a point in the movie when I remember Meg and Calvin running away from the It, in a sort of chase that I distinctly remember didn’t happen. They also had another scene where Meg goes riding on the backs of these giant green things that didn’t belong. Adventure and action isn’t bad, necessarily, but it wasn’t the point of the book. The book had a lot of messages about society, about culture, about family, about growing up, and these were sacrificed to make a movie that was essentially a fun romp through a wrinkle in time.

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Q #5: Is the book A Wrinkle in Time for teens (15y)?

A: Yes, I think it absolutely can be a great book for teens! It’s usually targeted at middle grade, which is ages 8-12, but I believe it could easily appeal to a teen as well.

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Q #6: Is A Wrinkle in Time considered to be a children’s book?

A: Yes. It’s great for kids ages 8 and up!

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Q #7: Is it possible to tether (teleport) just like characters from the movie A Wrinkle in Time?

A: I would say not that we know of. Of course, in A Wrinkle in Time, the three women who show Meg how to tesser are all otherwordly beings. Their knowledge surpasses our own. Even fifty or more years after the book was written, I would have to say that we don’t know enough about the universe to know whether or not tessering is possible. With our current technology, we can’t do it. However, with all of the laws of the universe we know, as far as I am aware, we can’t rule it out as possible.

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Four Most Interesting Questions about Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy

One of the things I really enjoyed about the first two books in The Century Trilogy was seeing life and the struggles of ordinary people in world wars 1 & 2.

I’m veering away from sci-fi/fantasy this month to look at a trilogy of historical fiction books.

CenturyTrilogy

Q #1: How historically accurate are Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy novels?

A: I’d say they are very historically accurate. I have a friend who is a history buff and he’s the one who recommended them to me. I don’t think he would have done so if they weren’t historically accurate. Also, Ken Follett puts a little disclaimer in the back of all the books. In each of them he uses a mixture of fiction characters with real characters. He only places the real characters in situations or locations where they either are known to have been at a specific time, or could have been at a specific time according to public knowledge. Ken Follett also consults experts on the various time periods he writes about – you can see who he consults in the acknowledgements section at the back of each book.

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Q #2: Did anyone make a movie about Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy?

A: Not yet, as far as I am aware. However, according to Ken Follett’s website, Sony Pictures and ABC are working on making it into a TV series: https://ken-follett.com/faq/

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Q #3: Are the British culture & government really as stagnant & stubborn as depicted in Ken Follett’s Century Trilogy?

A: I’ll do my best to answer this, though I don’t live in Britain, and have only been once, when I studied abroad from January-May in college. During that time, I didn’t really get to know a whole lot about British politics, so most of what I do know comes from films or other books I’ve read, which may or may not be accurate. I do remember seeing the film Darkest Hour a year or so ago, which seemed to depict a similarly stagnant and stubborn political landscape. In it, Winston Churchill has to fight tooth and nail against politicians who don’t want to go to war against the Nazis. Since I live in America, I know a lot more about American politics, and I will say that many of our politicians are stagnant & stubborn, so I don’t think those are necessarily traits unique to British politicians. In America it seems like every other day one politician or another is saying that something is too ambitious or radical to be passed, and we should aim for a more moderate solution. I think part of that is the nature of good politics, the other part might be some sort of selfishness or greed. The argument for things being stagnant is that if change happens too fast there’s a risk it can be the wrong sort of change. The government has a responsibility to make sure its people are cared for, and if something changes that makes things worse for the people, it can be worse than no change at all, especially if the people are already generally well cared for.

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Q #4: What are your thoughts on Ken Follett’s The Century Trilogy?

A: I think it is a solid read! The characters are very easy to relate to, and the history is written in a really appealing and educational way. However, I do feel that the third book in the trilogy was a little too spectacular. One of the things I really enjoyed about the first two books in The Century Trilogy was seeing life and the struggles of ordinary people in world wars 1 & 2. By the third book, a lot of these ordinary people have produced extraordinary children, and at times things that happened seemed cheesy or too convenient to happen in real life.

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Six Most Interesting Questions about Mistborn

A band of peasants, with magic powers that they can only use by consuming metal, make and execute a plan to kill the tyrant who oppresses their kind.

Mistborn

Q #1: Without spoilers, is Well of Ascension as good as the original Mistborn?

A: I personally don’t think it’s as good as the first book. And the reason for is that the characters are not as active. In the first book, the whole plot hinges upon Kelsier, Vin, and their crew taking action against the Lord Ruler. In the second book, the plot hinges on others taking action against Vin, Elend, and the crew. There are other subplots that keep things interesting, and mysteries to solve, but since the main characters feel more passive in the main plot, it isn’t quite as good as the first, I feel like.

Q #2: Is there a Mistborn movie?

A: There is an IMDB page for one. Check it out: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6638042/ . One thing that concerns me about a Mistborn movie is that Sanderson’s novel is pretty long. Not as long as his Stormlight Archive books, but I think it would still be hard to condense it into a movie without sacrificing major pieces of the plot or characters.

Q #3: What is a quick summary of the plot of Mistborn (Brandon Sanderson)?

A: I’ll keep it super quick. A band of peasants, with magic powers that they can only use by consuming metal, make and execute a plan to kill the tyrant who oppresses their kind.

Q #4: If you could be one race in Brandon Sanderson’s Cosmere which one would you be?

A: Since these are Mistborn questions I’ll answer that I’d love to be a Terrisman. In particular, a Feruchemist. Their power is essentially limitless if they can store up enough of it.

Q #5: Who would win, Kaladin Stormblessed or Vin the Mistborn?

A: Oooh, fun battle! I think it depends on if Vin has Atium. If she does, she will be able to see into the future, and know his every move. Then she would win for sure. Unless Kaladin just decided to flee. I think Kaladin could move faster, with his lashes, in an open sprint than Vin could. Vin would have to rely on dropping coins, or having other metal around that she could push or pull away from. If Vin doesn’t have Atium, and can’t see Kaladin’s every move, she would still have pewter, to increase her strength, so I think she would still win. Unless Kaladin can fight her from a distance, but mostly he seems not to wield long range weapons.

Q #6: What allomancer power would you pick from Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn series?

A: If I couldn’t be Mistborn, I’d pick steelpushing and be a coinshot. Reason being is that it would let me fly up into the air which would be awesome. It’s also a pretty good ability for protecting yourself, since you can push metal that might harm you away.

The Six Most Interesting Questions I Missed

For each of my previous posts, I primarily answered questions from Quora.com. I’m getting daily requests for new questions to answer, and I haven’t been able to keep up with them all. So, for this blog post, I’m going to make it my goal to address some of those questions…the most interesting ones, that is.

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Q #1: In Harry Potter, what do you think would happen if a young wizard couldn’t afford a wand?

A: They would probably be provided for. Remember how Harry got his wand? Olivander went about, trying each and every wand to see exactly which one was the best fit. There was no discussion of cost. For a wizard, a wand is so important that I don’t think cost would be taken into account, and Hogwarts wouldn’t have anyone attending who didn’t get the best wand for their needs, or at least have the opportunity to get the best wand for their needs.

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Q #2: A lot of dystopian books have the world splitting up into factions (Divergent), districts (The Hunger Games), or something similar in the future. How likely is this to actually happen far in the future?

A: I would say there’s two parts to this question. First, we have to consider whether it’s likely that the world will be ruled by one government in the future. If there’s not a single ruling entity, the whole world could not be split up into factions/districts. Second, we have to consider whether it’s likely that this one government would create a system of factions/districts. I think that it’s not particularly likely that the world would be ruled by one government in the future, so I don’t think we can even get to the second part of this question. The reason being is that in all of history the world has never been ruled by one government. Powerful countries have risen, like Rome, but they always fall, and never conquer the whole world. Plus, there is much more communication throughout the world nowadays, and more of an effort to keep super-countries from forming. Imperialism has even largely died out. If anything, there will be more countries in the far future, as people venture into and colonize space. However, it could still be that perhaps these factions/districts will form in a single country, and not the rest of the world. If this happens, that single country would have to either be aware of other countries where the districts/factions did not exist, or else they would have to be living a life with technology way behind their time, since I do not think the other countries could be hidden from that world with the technology we have nowadays, there is simply too much communication. I would say that one country developing the faction/district system is a much more likely scenario than the world adopting it, since there is such a wide array of ways a country could be run, though I think it unlikely the country running themselves this way could keep the rest of the world a secret.

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Q #3: What is the Avatar the Last Airbender Live action show going to be about?

A: As far as I’m aware, it’s just going to be a retelling of the animated show.

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Q #4: Who would win in a fight Percy Jackson or Optimus Prime?

A: I think it depends on where they’re fighting. On land or in the sky, Optimus Prime wins. In or near the water so that Percy can force the fight to the sea, he’d win.

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Q #5: What 3 unrelated books would make a weird but workable trilogy?

A: Fun question! I think my theme for answering this question will be riches-to-rags. So for the first book we have The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, because obviously Arthur Dent has to find a cool planet for the trilogy to take place on. Once he’s there, he’ll inevitably screw things up, and that’s how we get to Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson. The second book takes place about 1000 years after the first, and Arthur Dent is probably The Chosen One talked about so much in that book. Finally, after Mistborn, book three would be Holes by Louis Sachar, since by this time I imagine that’s what the day-to-day life on this planet would be like.

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Q #6: Why can only portraits in Harry Potter speak? Why not photographs?

A: Because of the way that wizarding magic works. I suspect there’s some sort of magic used to give portraits life, whereas with photographs that type of magic is not generally used. There are probably portraits that can’t speak, especially in muggle homes, it’s just that the ones we do see can speak. Photographs, likewise, I suspect could speak, if the witch or wizard who created them wanted them to, but the creator elects not to give them that power most of the time, so they don’t have the ability to speak. It all comes down to what magic is used.

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Twelve Most Interesting Questions about Captain Marvel

It’s the #1 movie because it’s a great film, with an engaging plot, lots of funny bits, and it was marketed very well.

WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD.

There are spoilers from Captain Marvel the movie in the following post. Please do not read any further if you don’t want to be spoiled by awesome analysis of what happens in the film.

CaptainMarvel

Q #1: How is Captain Marvel #1 movie in the world?

A: It’s obviously #1 because it rocks! Captain Marvel is riding high on the trend of superhero films. And the movie has a female lead, which is becoming less rare in superhero movies, but historically has been uncommon. Overall, however, it’s the #1 movie because it’s a great film, with an engaging plot, lots of funny bits, and it was marketed very well.

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Q #2: What’s a Flerken?

A: The Flerken are an alien species that resemble a human cat. As we saw in the movie, according to the Kree, the Flerken have a high threat-level. They can shoot tentacles out of their mouth, and are capable of using those tentacles to pull anything they want back into their mouths, even the Tesseract or a person. Also, in the comics, they are apparently able to lay up to 117 eggs, though we have yet to see them lay eggs in the movies. Here is some additional information about what a Flerken is: https://marvel.fandom.com/wiki/Flerken

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Q #3: Who would win, Mewtwo or Captain Marvel?

A: This is a really interesting idea for a fight! Mewtwo and Captain Marvel both have superhuman powers. In Mewtwo’s case, it comes from being a Pokemon, and a cloned and enhanced copy of Mew at that. In Captain Marvel’s case, she absorbed the power of an engine powered by the Tesseract. They can also both fly. Mewtwo does have an advantage in that he can heal himself; we didn’t see that ability from Captain Marvel in the movie, though it wouldn’t surprise me if she had that ability. Captain Marvel, on the other hand, has the advantage of being much faster than Mewtwo. Mewtwo’s attacks seem to take a few seconds to power up, while Captain Marvel, once her full powers are released, can blast someone in an instant. Because of this, I don’t think Mewtwo would stand a chance. Captain Marvel would easily use her superior speed to dodge his attacks, and hit him until he fainted, not giving him time to heal. Not to mention, up close, she would be much more strong physically than he is – Mewtwo is strong fighting at a distance.

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Q #4: How would you rate Brie Larson’s performance in the Captain Marvel movie?

A: I’d give Brie Larson an A+. I thought she did great acting in the movie, any notes I have on the movie as a whole are minimal, and none of them had to do with the acting. It was a great film and she was great in it.

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Q #5: Who would win in an arm wrestle, Thor or Captain Marvel?

A: Even if Captain Marvel’s not using her powers to heat things up and burn Thor’s hand, I think she wins. Some people point out how Thor opened up the iris of a neutron star, but Captain Marvel had her own superpowered moment. She not only grabbed and stopped a missile speeding towards earth from space, but she had enough strength to throw that missile back at other incoming missiles and blow them all up before they hit earth. So obviously she’d be a match for Thor in an arm wrestle, and I think she’d win.

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Q #6) Do you think Captain Marvel has the power of one of the Infinity Stones (space travel stone)?

A: Not exactly. But sort of. Her power is explained in the movie – her power comes from the Tesseract, which is also supposedly the cube in which the space stone was formerly held. Thus, it stands to reason that the space stone transferred some of its power to the Tesseract, and then the Tesseract transferred some of that power to Captain Marvel.

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Q #7: Is Captain Marvel/Carol Danvers a “Mary Sue”?

A: I would say no. She’s a strong character, but she does have flaws. Something that the movie points out is a flaw is that she has trouble with obeying authority and sticking to a plan. It doesn’t seem like a flaw in this movie, because the authority and the plans that are made are from the bad guys, the Kree, so it’s good to disobey them. However, this could get her in trouble in another movie, in particular I’m thinking about Avengers: Endgame where she will have to work with a large team. Also, this trouble with obeying authority is what got her in the airplane crash that gave her powers in the first place.

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Q #8: If Captain Marvel is pretty much made from the Tesseract, how is she meant to be more powerful than Thor with the Stormbreaker?

A: Because the power of the Tesseract is within her, and not just in a weapon she’s wielding. Also the Tesseract is powerful, much more powerful in my opinion than a weapon powered by a star, if used in the right hands.

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Q #9: How does Captain Marvel breathe in space?

A: This is a tricky question, and it’s not completely clear. At first, Captain Marvel is shown to have the ability to press a button and activate a helmet on her suit so that she can breathe. However, later, and after her full powers are activated, she goes into space without the full helmet. The only explanation I can think of is that her powers give her some ability to breathe in space, or else perhaps her powers make it so that she doesn’t need to breathe to stay alive.

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Q #10: Is Goose (Captain Marvel’s cat) relevant in the movie?

A: Yes. Goose is absolutely relevant, and has some great scenes. Though to be honest, one wouldn’t know it to be Captain Marvel’s cat in the movie. Fury takes more of a liking to Goose than Carol Danvers does. The only complaint I might have with Goose is the way in which they encountered the cat/Flerken. It was just standing in the middle of a hallway randomly. However, the creature more than made up for that when Captain Marvel told Fury to grab the Tesseract, then Fury said, while holding Goose, something like: “you can’t seriously expect me to touch that thing” and then Goose opened their mouth and tentacles shot out and grabbed the Tesseract. It was just so ironic because he was holding a Flerken and scared of touching the Tesseract. A Flerken’s much freakier.

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Q #11: Did the Captain Marvel movie live up to the hype? If not, what made you feel like it didn’t?

A: Yes, I think it absolutely did! My main critique is that I feel it dragged at the beginning, before Captain Marvel got to Earth. It wasn’t totally clear why she was fighting, and what exactly motivated her. Once she got to Earth, those problems disappeared, because suddenly she needed to get home, and we also got to see her hilariously interacting with 90s technology. I think the movie could have gotten her to Earth faster, or else spent more effort in identifying what her life was like as a Kree and what she cared about, though that may have been difficult to do without giving away that she had only been living with the Kree for the last six years.

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Q #12: Who would win, Yoda or Captain Marvel?

A: Saving the best for last. Yoda versus Captain Marvel would be a great fight. Yoda has the advantage of being small, so hard to hit, as well as being quick and agile, he might even be able to match her speed. With his lightsaber, he can probably block Captain Marvel’s photon blasts, and he can use the power of the force, which is kind of a wildcard in this given it takes some time, even for him, to connect with the force and use it to move objects. Any fight with Captain Marvel is bound to be fast-paced, so he might not have time to use the force very much, unless he distracts her. Captain Marvel ultimately does have the upper-hand, however. She can fly, and up close, Yoda would be no match for Captain Marvel. All she would need is a single punch to eliminate him, and due to her superspeed she’d able to dodge his lightsaber up close. So she would win.

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Six Most Interesting Questions about The Divergent Series

But in reality the choice has already been made for them, and the choice isn’t the choice of what faction to be in; it’s the choice of whether to accept a world in which everyone is divided into different factions.

DivergentBooks

Q #1: Which series should I read first: The Lord of the Rings, Percy Jackson, The Maze Runner, or Divergent?

A: It depends on what you like to read and who you are! I myself have read all of them except for The Maze Runner and they were all great. I would recommend Percy Jackson to anyone who’s in middle-school or approaching middle-school. It is probably the most relatable and interesting for that age-range. On the other hand, I’d recommend The Lord of the Rings for older readers – anyone who loves complex worlds especially. If you’re in college or beyond, or an advanced reader in high school, and love fantasy that’d probably be the best read. If you like Game of Thrones it’s probably the most similar of any of these to that. Divergent is quite a bit different – I would probably recommend it to high school or college kids, and I would especially recommend it to anyone who loves romance – it has some pretty heavy romance in it, and would be great for any readers who enjoyed books like The Hunger Games or Twilight.

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Q #2: In Divergent, what is the point of an aptitude test if you choose your faction anyway?

A: This is up to interpretation I think, but here’s my interpretation. I think that the aptitude test is there to reinforce the idea of factions, and to reinforce factions as the right thing. By having everyone take an aptitude test, kids are basically being prepared for the fact that they fit in better with some people and in some places than in other places and with other people. The aptitude test is one of the first ways in which people are divided and separate and put into different buckets. It starts the narrowing down, and then I think that the choice is given about what faction to be in as a way for the people in control to trick those choosing their factions into thinking they are making the choice. But in reality the choice has already been made for them, and the choice isn’t the choice of what faction to be in; it’s the choice of whether to accept a world in which everyone is divided into different factions.

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Q #3: What would the Dauntless faction think of space travel?

A: The Dauntless would love space travel! As the most adventurous and daring of the factions, I think they’d probably be the ones to be astronauts, or go up in space first, even though the technology would have to be something that Erudite developed. I think that if space travel did progress to the point where things were like Star Trek in the Divergent universe, then the Dauntless would probably be the dominant faction due to their bravery and willingness to venture into the unknown and make discoveries.

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Q #4: Why do authors of novels like The Hunger Games and Divergent prefer not to spend time and effort on detailed world-building?

A: I know it may seem like they don’t, but I would argue they do. As a writer myself, I know there is a lot of preparation and work that is done before even putting pen to paper. One thing to keep in mind is that Veronica Roth and Suzanne Collins likely chose not to include every single detail about their worlds because it would be too much, slow down the story, and not make for as interesting as a narrative. Part of being a writer is to know how much worldbuilding to show in your story and how much to withhold. One thing that is often used is the metaphor of an iceberg. Icebergs are huge, but we only see the small portion that is above the water when we encounter them. Worldbuilding is like that too. The best stories show you only a small portion of the world, while promising that there is a whole lot more underneath the surface waiting to be seen later.

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Q #5: If Tris and Four from Divergent went to Hogwarts, what house would they be in?

A: I think they’d be in Gryffindor! The reason why is because they are brave, but they are not cruel, like some of the Dauntless. I think that all Dauntless would probably be in either Gryffindor or Slytherin. The Erudites on the other hand could be in either Ravenclaw or Slytherin, the Candor in either Hufflepuff or Ravenclaw, and Amity I would say are probably usually in Hufflepuff while the Abnegation are probably either Gryffindor or Hufflepuff.

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Q #6: Something similar to Divergent?

A: The most similar thing I can think of is The Hunger Games! They both came out around the same time too. I would say that Twilight could be something that most readers of Divergent might enjoy also. Another lesser known series I would suggest is called The Guardians of Time by Marianne Curley. It isn’t a dystopian story, but it does deliver a similarly heavy dose of romance. Here’s a link to the Amazon page for the first book: The Named.

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Three Quick Questions about Eragon

Christopher Paolini’s new book is called The Fork, the Witch, and the Worm, and it’s set in the same world as Eragon was, Alagaesia.

Eragons

Q #1: What if Eragon fought Gandalf?

A: If Eragon fought Gandalf, I believe he would lose. As awesome and powerful as Eragon is (he has powerful magic, Sapphira, his sword), he doesn’t have anywhere near the amount of experience that Gandalf does. Gandalf’s experience would give him the edge in my opinion.

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Q #2: What book would you recommend to someone who loves Eragon?

A: I’m going to recommend some non-dragon books. I believe the Pendragon series by D.J. MacHale would appeal to the same demographic as Eragon does. If the reader is a bit older, I would recommend Brandon Sanderson. Mistborn is a great place to start. The Ranger’s Apprentice series is also pretty good.

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Q #3: How can I download The Fork, the Witch, and the Worm: Tales from Alagaesia by Christopher Paolini?

Christopher Paolini’s new book is called The Fork, the Witch, and the Worm, and it’s set in the same world as Eragon was, Alagaesia. You can purchase it on Amazon, here’s a link. You can also probably purchase it from many bookstores and online. Here’s a link to the book on Paolini’s website: link. In my opinion it’s best to pay for these things if you can, to support all the work that goes into them!

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